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A Victorian Scrapbook

A Scrapbook of Newspaper Articles Compiled by George Burgess (1829-1905)

Temperance in the Victorian Era

Harvest Work Without Strong Drink

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Transcript from original newspaper article: -
HARVEST WORK WITHOUT STRONG DRINK.

Harvest Work Without Strong DrinkOn Sept. 27th, the eighteenth public entertainment to celebrate Harvest Home was held in Bodmin. About fifty teetotal labourers were regaled with a free supper, preceded in the afternoon by a procession with music, a public tea, &c. In the evening a public meeting was held, presided over by Mr. H. MUDGE. Thirteen persons gave in succession their testimony in favour of total abstinence principles, and their ability to discharge their labour better without intoxicating drinks than ever they could with them. Among the rest, JOHN HARRIS, of Luxillion, 76 years old, who had worked on the teetotal principle for eighteen years, stated, that since he began, he had cut his two acres of grass in one day, and four acres in two days. W. BRAY, of Withiel, was 59 years old, and had tried both sides. During his first teetotal harvest he was the only man that abstained. FREDERICK TREVERTON, of St. Mabyn, had been for nine harvests a teetotaller. This year he had been at harvest for nine weeks, and three workmen had cut sixty acres of grass. Mr. COLEMAN, of Bodmin, had saved thirty-six acres in sixteen days. Mr. JOHN ROBINS, of Withiel, had been a teetotaller ten years; and this year, by the help of twelve men, had saved a hundred and ten acres. JOHN NICHOLLS, of Luxillion, had, with a comrade aged 62, mowed twenty-four acres in thirteen days. MARK WELLINGTON, of Luxillion, aged 69, had been a teetotler for twelve harvests, and for thirty-one years had worked with the same family.

Such are a few of the telling facts which forcibly illustrate the practicability and advantages of total abstinence. With testimonies like these we can well afford to smile at the positive philosophy of the Westminster Reviewer. – Cornwall and Devon Temperance Journal.