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A Victorian Scrapbook

A Scrapbook of Newspaper Articles Compiled by George Burgess (1829-1905)

Victorian Politics and History

Deaths of English Kings

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Transcript from original newspaper article, followed by a modified version with added dates: -

Original Article: -

Deaths of English Kings.Deaths of English Kings - William the Conqueror died from enormous fatness, from drink, and the violence of his passions. William Rufus died the death of the poor stags that he hunted. Henry the First died of Gluttony. Henry the second died of a broken heart, occasioned by the bad conduct of his children. Richard Coeur de Lion died like the animal from which his heart was named, by an arrow from an archer. John died, nobody knows how, but it is said of chagrin, which we suppose, is another term for a dose of hellebore. Henry the Third is said to have died a natural death. Edward the First is likewise said to have died of a “natural sickness,” a sickness which it would puzzle all the college of physicians to denominate. Edward the Second was most barbarously and indecently murdered by ruffians employed by his own mother and her paramour. Edward the Third died of dotage, and Richard the Second of starvation. Henry the Fourth is said to have died of “fits caused by uneasiness,” and uneasiness in palaces in those times was a very common complaint. Henry the Fifth is said to have died “of a painful affliction, prematurely!” This is a courtly phrase for getting rid of a king. Henry the Sixth died in prison, by means known then only to his gaoler, and known now only to heaven. Edward the Fifth was strangled in the Tower, by his uncle Richard the Third. Richard the Third was killed in battle. Henry the Seventh wasted away as a miser ought to do. Henry the Eighth died of carbuncles, fat, and fury. Edward the Sixth died of a decline. Queen Mary is said to have died of “a broken heart,” whereas, she died of a surfeit, from eating too much of black puddings. Old Queen Bess is said to have died of melancholy, from having sacrificed Essex to his enemies. James the First died of drinking. Charles the First died a righteous death on the scaffold. Charles the Second died suddenly, it is said of apoplexy. William the Third died from consumptive habits of the body, and from the stumbling of his horse. Queen Anne died from her attachment to “strong water,” or, in other words, from drunkenness. Which the physicians politely called dropsy. George the First died of drunkenness, which his physicians as politely called an apoplectic fit. George the Second died by a rupture of the heart, which the periodicals of that day termed a visitation of God. George the Third died as he had lived – a madman. Throughout life, he was at least a consistent monarch. George the Fourth died of gluttony and drunkenness. William the Forth died amidst the sympathies of his subjects – New York Paper.


Modified version with dates added: -


DEATH OF ENGLISH KINGS & QUEENS

House of Normandy
1066-1087 William the Conqueror died from enormous fatness, from drink, and the violence of his passions.
1087-1100 William Rufus died the death of the poor stags that he hunted.
1100-1135 Henry the First died of Gluttony.
1135-1154 Stephen

House of Plantagenet
1154-1189 Henry the second died of a broken heart, occasioned by the bad conduct of his children.
1189-1199 Richard Coeur de Lion died like the animal from which his heart was named, by an arrow from an archer.
1199-1216 John died, nobody knows how, but it is said of chagrin, which we suppose, is another term for a dose of hellebore.
1216-1272 Henry the Third is said to have died a natural death.
1272-1307 Edward the First is likewise said to have died of a “natural sickness,” a sickness which it would puzzle all the college of physicians to denominate.
1307-1327 Edward the Second was most barbarously and indecently murdered by ruffians employed by his own mother and her paramour.
1327-1377 Edward the Third died of dotage, and
1377-1399 Richard the Second of starvation.

House of Lancaster
1399-1413 Henry the Fourth is said to have died of “fits caused by uneasiness,” and uneasiness in palaces in those times was a very common complaint.
1413-1422 Henry the Fifth is said to have died “of a painful affliction, prematurely!” This is a courtly phrase for getting rid of a king.

1422-1461

Henry the Sixth died in prison, by means known then only to his gaoler, and known now only to heaven.

House of York
1461-1483 Edward IV
1483 Edward the Fifth was strangled in the Tower, by his uncle Richard the Third.
1483-1485 Richard the Third was killed in battle.

House of Tudor
1485-1509 Henry the Seventh wasted away as a miser ought to do.
1509-1547 Henry the Eighth died of carbuncles, fat, and fury.
1547-1553 Edward the Sixth died of a decline.
1853-1858 Queen Mary is said to have died of "a broken heart,” whereas, she died of a surfeit, from eating too much of black puddings.
1858-1603 Old Queen Bess (Elizabeth I) is said to have died of melancholy, from having sacrificed Essex to his enemies.

Houser of Stuart
1603-1625 James the First died of drinking.
1625-1649 Charles the First died a righteous death on the scaffold.

Civil unrest and civil war from the early 1640s leads to Civil Rule by Parliament with Oliver Cromwell as Protectorate until his death in September 1658. He was succeeded by his elder surviving son, Richard Cromwell, who served as Protector for around eight months, until an army coup in the spring 1659 led to his ejection and to the collapse of the Protectorate as a whole. Roughly a year later, in the spring 1660, the Stuart monarchy was restored.


1660-1685 Charles the Second died suddenly, it is said of apoplexy.
1685-1688 James II
1689-1694 William III & Mary (Jointly)
House of Orange
1694-1702 William the Third died from consumptive habits of the body, and from the stumbling of his horse.
1702-1714 Queen Anne died from her attachment to “strong water,” or, in other words, from drunkenness. Which the physicians politely called dropsy.

House of Hanover
1714-1727 George the First died of drunkenness, which his physicians as politely called an apoplectic fit.
1727-1760 George the Second died by a rupture of the heart, which the periodicals of that day termed a visitation of God.
1760-1820 George the Third died as he had lived – a madman. Throughout life, he was at least a consistent monarch.
1820-1830 George the Fourth died of gluttony and drunkenness.
1830-1837 William the Forth died amidst the sympathies of his subjects –
1837-1901 Queen Victoria

House of Saxe-Coburg
1901-1910 Edward VII
House of Windsor
1910-1936 George V (a Saxe-Coburg until 1917)
1936 Edward VIII
1936-1952 George VI
1952- Elizabeth II
 
New York Paper.

Relevant Link: - List of the monarchs of the Kingdom of England