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Mother's Last Words by Mary Sewell

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Mother's Last Words by Mary Sewell page 14

 

“Well, Christopher, last night, I thought
I should be sure to go to hell;
What sort of place that’s like to be,
I’ve now a notion I could tell.”

“I’m pretty sure, if I had died
Last night, without my-sins forgiven,
I’d not a single chance to go,
To be with mother, up in heaven.”

“I wish I’d never touched the shoes;
To steal is such a shameful sin,
And though they’ve taken back again,
I don’t feel yet all right within.”

“It was so bad, to go and steal!
Four months to-day you know she died;
And though we’ve fared quite hard enough,
Out wants have mostly been supplied.”

“Some boys, we know, have had no bed,
A deal worse off than you and I.
For we have always had some bread,
And just a place where we could lie.”

“And now, we’ve got some clothes to wear,
And days will soon be getting long.
And then, old boy, we’ll shortly see
You picking up, and getting strong.”

“I don’t know, John – I fancy not,
I sometimes think I’m going to die.
I dream so much about the place
Where mother went – I don’t know why.”

“Except, maybe, I’m going too;
I saw one night, John, in a doze,
That Angel, that my mother saw,
With snowy wings and shining clothes.